April 20, 2015

Workers Abusing ADHD Drugs to Get Ahead

Workers Abusing ADHD Drugs to Get Ahead

We’ve long seen it among college students – the abuse of medications that treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to help improve study habits. Most ADHD medications, when taken by those who do not have ADHD, act like speed in the body. They focus attention and stave off drowsiness. Students use the drugs to help them study. Now, we are seeing the same type of misuse among workers.

The New York Times reports:

A 2013 report by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration found that emergency room visits related to nonmedical use of prescription stimulants among adults 18 to 34 tripled from 2005 to 2011, to almost 23,000.

The agency also reported that from 2010 to 2012, people entering substance rehabilitation centers cited stimulants as their primary substance of abuse 15 percent more often than in the previous three-year period.

Often overshadowed by abuse of prescription painkillers, abuse of prescription stimulants is a very real and developing problem.

While there is an immediate and short term perceived benefit to using stimulants to concentrate, their long term use provides nothing but harm. The New York Times continues:

 few studies suggest that they improve a person’s ability to learn or understand.

And yes, while an individual will likely be more productive in the short term, do you really want to see a doctor who’s seeing more patients because s/he’s hyped up on drugs or get advice from a lawyer who’s not sleeping to handle more cases? If it is you who is abusing the medications, you can look forward to the dismantling of your sleep cycle process, the possibility of overdose, addiction, heart damage and other disorders.

Is what you’re trading your health for really worth it?

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/19/us/workers-seeking-productivity-in-a-pill-are-abusing-adhd-drugs.html?_r=0

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